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Prince Toreus Rhann,Junior


Prince Toreus Rhann,Junior.


"Hither came, black-haired, keen-eyed, sword in hand, a thief, a reaver, a slayer, with gigantic melancholies and gigantic mirth, to tread the jeweled thrones of the Earth under his booted feet." Forward. Know this, my Friends-somewhere between the Great Cataclysmic Era’s of the Central Pangea Shattered Empires and the Great Fall of Civilizations, the rise and fall of Trongaroth Empires and the Great Rise of Empires upon the Pangean Shattered Lands and rise of the New Son of Terra-Prime, there an age of great heroes and heroines-warriors and, time sorcerers, who fought for the Lords of Light against the Dark Forces of evil. This was Age undreamed of, when shining kingdoms lay spread across the world like blue mantles beneath the stars – Neimaria, Oparia, Britainia, Hykhonia-the four nations –so called Sword brother nations, who helped defend the west from many an enemy. Zhankhora with its dark-haired women and dark haired brave hearted men, who fought against Metrone spider-armies of the Casparean Mountains, Zhankhearia The most powerful sea raiders next to their Zhankhoria rivals, the Zhankhearian are active supporters of the Casparian buccaneers, Kothankhora-the great alliance of City States that bordered the pastoral lands of Shonkhora to the East, with its shadow-guarded tombs, and mystery haunted gleaming towers of gold Mankhorian Nomads, whose spike riders wore steel and silk and gold. It was said, a Mankhorian Nomad, learned ride before he or she could walk.

The Drakhoneans and the Arkhon twine kingdoms-Gleaming mailed and silken clad riders, masters of the Black Burning Sea, Twine Kingdoms revels in sweeping the barely contested wastelands to the west and south .The Khaiton ancient empire, stronghold of the world's greatest time wizards and masters of the eastern world.


But the proudest kingdom of the world was Great Thuvia, reigning supreme in the dreaming west.It’s Great Seven Kingdoms of Hither out of Great Thuvia came Prince Toreus Rhann, also sometimes known as Toreus the Slayer by his enemies and Prince Toreus, Lord of Lions black-haired, sullen-eyed, great Thuvian sword in hand, Grand Thuvian Armor and blaster in hand a slayer of many enemies, with gigantic strength and great courage, to tread the jeweled thrones of the Terra-Prime with the Great Capronean Lion –Shakhorja by his side with other heroes bring down the dark forces of evil and light back to the New Sons of Terra-prime." - The Thuvian Chronicles-Prince Toreus Rhann, the Third. This is a tale of Prince Toreus Rhann. The First Son of Thuvia, also sometimes known as Toreus the Slayer by his enemies and Prince Toreus, Lord of Lions, by friends, companions, and allies. Not to be confused with Toreus Rhann I, his esteemed father. Much has been said about that worthy elsewhere in the Chronicles of Pangaea and the Book of Thuvia.

Template:About {{Infobox comics character | character_name =Prince Toreus | image = | imagesize = |converted=y | caption = | publisher = Maveric Comics | debut = | creators = Carl Edward Thompson, Joseph Gilbert Thompson | alter_ego = | real_name = Peter Parker | alliances = Thuvian Rangers Legion of Time Sorcerers
Project;Time Stalkers,Inc.
Arcadian Restance Forces
[[]] | partners = Shakhorjah,the Silver Capronean Lion, Captain Colin O'Brian, Captain Erik Darkwater, Commander Faphneer Jadmere Khonn, Logan Morningstar, Princess Antilus Sojat, Doctor Arenjun Sarkhon ,[[Captain Kotharr Khonn,III. | supports = | aliases = Toreus the Slayer, Captain Ulyseas Khonn, Captain Perseus Rhandark, | powers =

  • Superhuman strength, speed, stamina, agility, reflexes, and durability
  • Accelerated healing factor
  • Ability to cling to most surfaces
  • Precognitive spider sense
  • Genius-Level Intellect,Peak physical strength, speed, agility and reflexes,

Ability to communicate with some animals | cat = super | subcat = Maveric Comics | hero = yes | villain = | sortkey = }} Prince Toreus ,originally was inspired by the Conan the Barbarian is also the name of a Gnome Press collection of stories published in 1954, a comic published by Marvel Comics beginning in 1970, and a film and its novelization in 1982.Prince Toreus sabertoothed Capronean Silver haired lion Shakhorja, who possesses -human intelligence thanks to his Atlantean Lion ancestry.Atlantean dogs and cat, are bred for greater intelligence and longer life span. When presented with a situation where a weaker individual or party is being preyed upon by a stronger foe, Toreus invariably takes the side of the weaker party. In dealing with other men Toreus is firm and forceful. With male friends he is reserved but deeply loyal and generous. As a host he is likewise generous and gracious. As a leader he commands devoted loyalty. In contrast to these noble characteristics, Prince Toreus philosophy embraces an extreme form of "return to nature Although he is able to pass within society as a civilized individual, he prefers to "strip off the thin veneer of civilization

Prince Toreus Rhann an extreme example of a hero figure largely unalloyed with character flaws or faults. Prince Toreus Rhann is described as being Caucasian, extremely athletic, tall, handsome, and tanned, with grey eyes and black hair. Emotionally, he is courageous, loyal and steady. He is intelligent and learns new languages easily. He is presented as behaving ethically, Telepathic, by way his Guider Gem and bioelectrical powers, by way, hidden mechanisms within his Thuvian Battle Armor. Regenerative healing factor Superhuman senses, strength, agility, stamina, reflexes and longevity Domatium-laced skeletal structure with retractable claws Expert martial artist The various stories of Prince Toreus occur in the fictional "," of the sphere, known as Terra-Prime set after the destruction of and before the rise of the ancient civilizations, that proceeded the Great Trongaroth Invasion and the rise of the New Sons of Terra-Prime . This is a specific epoch in a fictional timeline created by Howard for many of the low fantasy tales of his artificial legendary

By conceiving a timeless setting — "a vanished age" — and by carefully choosing names that resembled human history, Howard shrewdly avoided the problem of historical anachronisms and the need for lengthy exposition.

==Personality and character==

A MacGuffin (sometimes McGuffin or maguffin) is "a plot element that catches the viewers' attention or drives the plot of a work of fiction".[1]

Sometimes, the specific nature of the MacGuffin is not important to the plot such that anything that serves as a motivation serves its purpose. The MacGuffin can sometimes be ambiguous, completely undefined, generic or left open to interpretation.

MacGuffins are sometimes referred to as plot couponsTemplate:Fact (especially if multiple ones are required) as the protagonist only needs to "collect enough plot coupons and trade them in for a dénouement".

The MacGuffin is common in films, especially thrillers. Commonly, though not always, the MacGuffin is the central focus of the film in the first act, and later declines in importance as the struggles and motivations of characters play out. Sometimes the MacGuffin is even forgotten by the end of the film.

History and use Edit

The director and producer Alfred Hitchcock popularized both the term "MacGuffin" and the technique. Hitchcock explained the term "McGuffin" in a 1939 lecture at Columbia University: "[We] have a name in the studio, and we call it the 'MacGuffin'. It is the mechanical element that usually crops up in any story. In crook stories it is almost always the necklace and in spy stories it is most always the papers".[2]

Interviewed in 1966 by François Truffaut, Alfred Hitchcock illustrated the term "MacGuffin" with this story:[3]

It might be a Scottish name, taken from a story about two men in a train. One man says "What's that package up there in the baggage rack?", and the other answers "Oh that's a McGuffin". The first one asks "What's a McGuffin?". "Well", the other man says, "It's an apparatus for trapping lions in the Scottish Highlands". The first man says "But there are no lions in the Scottish Highlands", and the other one answers "Well, then that's no McGuffin!". So you see, a McGuffin is nothing at all.

Hitchcock related this anecdote in a television interview for Richard Schickel's documentary The Men Who Made the Movies. Hitchcock's verbal delivery made it clear that the second man has thought up the MacGuffin explanation as a roundabout method of telling the first man to mind his own business. According to author Ken Mogg, screenwriter Angus MacPhail, a friend of Hitchcock's, may have originally coined the term.[4]

On the commentary soundtrack to the 2004 DVD release of Star Wars, writer and director George Lucas describes R2-D2 as "the main driving force of the movie ... what you say in the movie business is the MacGuffin ... the object of everybody's search".[5] In TV interviews, Hitchcock defined a MacGuffin as the object around which the plot revolves, but, as to what that object specifically is, he declared, "the audience don't care".[6] Lucas, on the other hand, believes that the MacGuffin should be powerful and that "the audience should care about it almost as much as the dueling heroes and villains on-screen".[7]

The term has lent itself to several "in" jokes: in Mel Brooks' film High Anxiety, which parodies many Hitchcock films, a minor plot point is advanced by a mysterious phone call from a "Mr. MacGuffin". In the Movie Léon, when Léon and Mathilda check into the hotel, Mathilda tells Léon she's filling the form out with "the name of a girl in my class who makes me sick." Following with "If things get hot, she'll take the heat". Later in the movie we hear the Hotel manager banging on the hotel room door exclaiming "Mr MacGuffin?!" Further, it has been adopted as the name of a game development studio as a reference to a design object which forces interactivity onto a narrative.[8]

Examples Edit

Films Edit

Television Edit

Literature Edit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. MacGuffin, Princeton University, WordNet 3.0
  2. According to the Oxford English Dictionary.
  3. Template:Cite book
  4. Frequently asked questions on Hitchcock
  5. 5.0 5.1 Star Wars (1977) Region 2 DVD release (2004). Audio commentary, 00:14:44 - 00:15:00.
  6. http://www.filmreference.com/Films-Thr-Tur/The-39-Steps.html
  7. Keys to the Kingdom, a February 2008 Vanity Fair article
  8. http://www.macguffingames.com/about/
  9. Hitchcock's Films Revisited, Robin Wood, (1989), Columbia University Press.
  10. The Maltese Falcon at Filmsite.org
  11. Template:Cite book
  12. Template:Cite book
  13. 13.0 13.1 The Columbus Dispatch: Who's Got The MacGuffin?
  14. Soundstage! Network Home Theater & Sound, Collector's Corner, citing Truffaut, Hitchcock (1985 rev. ed.)
  15. 15.0 15.1 Template:Cite book
  16. Psycho at Filmsite.org
  17. Late Show with David Letterman, airdate 20 May 2008
  18. Much Ado About MacGuffin: David Bax On Suspect Plot Devices
  19. Tarantino A to Zed: The Films of Quentin Tarantino, Alan Barnes /w Marcus Hearn (2000).
  20. Urban Legends Reference Pages: Pulp Fiction Briefcase
  21. ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest’ - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
  22. Template:Cite web
  23. Template:Cite web
  24. http://www.heyuguys.co.uk/2009/09/28/review-jack-said
  25. http://storytellersunplugged.com/blog/2010/01/02/ill-take-one-hot-coffee-and-a-super-sized-macguffin-to-go-please/
  26. Editorial Review of "Alias - The Complete First Season" at Amazon.com
  27. Review of The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. at DVDVerdict.com
  28. A Matter of Perspective (1990) Region 1 DVD release (2002). Season 3, Disk 4.
  29. Template:Cite web
  30. Template:Cite web
  31. The Independent, A Week in Books: An ingenious comedy-thriller, packed with clever gags by Boyd Tonkin, 24 June 2005
  32. The Independent, 54 By Wu Ming reviewed by David Isaacson, 11 July 2005
  33. The Hartford Advocate, Hartford Advocate reviews 'Spook Country'

Further readingEdit

  • Francois Truffaut. Hitchcock
  • Slavoj Zizek. Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Lacan (But Were Afraid to Ask Hitchcock)
  • Slavoj Zizek. The Sublime Object of Ideology

External linksEdit

de:MacGuffin es:Macguffin eo:Makgufino eu:MacGuffin fa:مک‌گافین fr:MacGuffin gl:Macguffin ko:맥거핀 it:MacGuffin he:מקגאפין ja:マクガフィン pl:MacGuffin ru:Макгаффин simple:MacGuffin (cipher) sl:MacGuffin fi:MacGuffin uk:Макгафін zh:麥高芬

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