Fandom

Maveric Universe Wiki

Cody Starbuck

1,341pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

==Cody Starbuck-is a fictional character created by Howie Chaykin in the 1970's.Similar to other Chaykin characters ,such as Dominic Fortune,Lord Ironwolf,Rueben Flag and so on.Elon Cody Starbuck From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia You have a new message from another user (last change).


Find sources: "Elon Cody Starbuck" –(March 2009) Elon Cody Starbuck is a fictional space pirate created by Howard Chaykin, who first appeared in Star Reach magazine issue #1, and also appeared in various issues of the graphics magazine Heavy Metal.One of his early characters was Ironwolf, featured in the last three issues, of the short-lived Weird Worlds. Ironwolf was an officer in the Empire Galaktika, who got caught between two warring factions and ended up turning space pirate with his ship, the Limerick Rake. It’s hard not to see certain parallels to Han Solo, and Ironwolf even at one time seeks refuge with a rebel leader (who turns out to be as corrupt as everyone else). “They took away his world, now he’s fighting an empire to get it back…” even appears on the cover of one of the issues. Associations with Star Wars and Conan come fast and hard,in that book did share similar elements-long haired rogue heroes,pirates,stronge red female warriors,working a rebel group-here a rebel government,an evil empire,all mixed various annochronic science fiction troupes.Difference those elements worked with the likes of Conan and Star Wars,and were mishandled with Ironwolf.

Ironwolf was short-lived, but Chaykin soon revisited the Alex Raymond-like concept of a swashbuckling space-pirate with Cody Starbuck, who premiered in Star Reach magazine #1, published in April, 1974. Complete with cutlass and six-shooters, Cody Starbuck could easily have been an x-rated prototype of Han Solo.Whether that’s the case or not is hard to say. Han Solo is more gunslinger than swashbuckler. And while it’s easy to say space-pirate and think they’re two birds of a feather, fact of the matter is that Chaykin’s stories were of a considerably different type and tone than anything Star Wars ever was. Yes, they abound with ambassadors, star fleets and an emperor, and yes Cody Starbuck even went so far as to rescue a princess. But where Han Solo was a scoundrel, Cody Starbuck was often decidedly vicious and amoral. “Thus begins an odyssey of violence,” reads one panel, and indeed it did.Starbuck was more a retrea of Ironwolf.Cody Starbuck even had a star ship called the Limerick Rake,was used with Lord Ironwolf.There once again,an evil empire-this one christian based.

Starbuck is the earliest example of a character that later became characteristic of Chaykin's work:Ironwolf,Dominic Fortune,Monark Starstalker a swashbuckling, morally ambivalent, free-wheeling good/bad guy in a decadent, sexually explicit universe, who looks more than a little bit like Chaykin himself.Star*Reach #1, the first of Friedrich's industry-altering comics, was dated April, 1974. Its contents included Death Building, by Jim Starlin Dreadstar, Warlock; A Tale of Sword & Sorcery, by Ed Hicks (who has no other writing credits in comics) and Walt Simonson (Thor, Manhunter); and Cody Starbuck, written and drawn by Howard Chaykin, whose credits also include American Flagg and Black Kiss.Howard Chaykin's contribution was the only thing in Star*Reach #1 that had a significant impact on the comics field; and in fact, the biggest property ever to come out of Star*Reach.. The Star*Reach stories were less about saving the world from doomsday weapons, and more about simply surviving where life was cheap.Cody Starbucks world of Curvaceous, scantily clad women and hard-boiled, one-liner spouting man’s men in stories where drugs, prostitution and hyper-violence was everyday business. It was all underlined by experimental stylistic directions, sociopolitical commentary and an often dark sense of humor that kept the stories from drifting too far overboard.

STAR*REACH launched with Cody Starbuck.When his Cody Starbuck debuted, his drawing style was very reminiscent of Alex Toth. A grand space opera, Cody Starbuck mirrored many of the themes later seen in the 1977 blockbuster film Star Wars. Space pirate Cody Starbuck effectively stripped the last shreds of mainstream heroism from the Iron Wolf model, introduced an integrated visual/verbal narrative style that Howard would spend much of his career refining and developing, and created a template for creation after creation to come, not only for Howard but for the business. When Starbuck debuted, it emphasized the direction that Gary Friedrich wanted to carve. When Starbuck subsequently got his own one-shot, it spurred a generation of comics pros to want the same for themselves and their creations, even if few had the faith or drive to get it. Apocryphally, Cody Starbuck is also rumored to be the inspiration for Han Solo in George Lucas' STAR WARS.Although,other than Mister Chaykins claims,nothing is solidly connected between the two characters. And remember that classic Indiana Jones scene, where Indy, faced with a charging swordsman, pulls a gun and shoots him? There it is in the second Cody Starbuck story, c. 1976.

Cody Starbuck is the darkest of these characters; in early stories he is gleefully venal and treacherous, generally doing good only if the price is right. He can be seen as a more amoral version of Ironwolf, a character previously drawn and plotted by Chaykin for Weird Worlds in 1973.Chaykin claime that Starbuck,was loosely based on either actor John Wayne or Gary Cooper.[1] He also resembles Dominic Fortune, created by Howard Chaykin in 1975 for Marvel Comics.Cody Starbuck was seen a couple more times in Star*Reach, which finally published him in his own title in 1978. But as that company withdrew from the hands-on aspect of comics publishing, Chaykin, as owner of the character, was free to take him elsewhere. He was published in several issues of Heavy Metal in 1981,with full painted comic pages,along an illustration on the cover.A stellar run of painted comics also appears in HEAVY METAL (including revivals of Cody Starbuck and his other STAR*REACH co-creation, Gideon Faust) and EPIC MAGAZINE After that, Chaykin seems to have largely lost interest in the character,along many others,with the exception of revamped version of Ironwolf and went on to other similar creations.



'

Publication history[edit]' Edit

Cody Starbuck first appeared in Star Reach #1. The story was 16 pages, black and white. A planetary lord hired Starbuck to rescue his bride, who had been kidnapped for ransom by a monk of the Sanctuary of St.Berryl, a former leper colony.Following on from Ironwolf, Cody was Howie Chaykin's first real go at what has since become the patented Chaykin hero: A morally ambivalent, free-wheeling good/bad guy in a decadent, sexually explicit universe who looks more than a little bit like Howie himself.

Cody Starbuck is the darkest of these characters; In his previous stories being gleefully venal & treacherous, and generally only doing good if the price is right. Basically a hero, but only just,as a sort of X-rated Han Solo, if you like. Howard Chaykin was one of the early adopters of the Star*Reach approach to publishing. His creation, Cody Starbuck, debuted the first issue of the anthology Star*Reach. Four years later, in 1978, Starbuck graduated to its own one-shot. In his introduction to the 1978 Cody Starbuck unnumbered one-shot, Friedrich wrote: “Chaykin not only shakes the tree of traditional space-opera, he pulverizes it. Don’t be fooled by the professional graphics. This is a punk comic.”


Howard was just coming off a multi-issue run on Marvel’s Star Wars comics and the set-in-space Cody is Howard unfettered by the demands of a licensed corporate property. Starbuck mixes classic Chaykin elements, sex, violence, pop culture and religion, which gets an extra-special poke in the ribs. There’s even a scene in the comic that makes Friedrich’s “stomach turn with its violence,” which prompted the “adults only” label on the front cover. Inside, Starbuck is stranded on a planet where The Vatican “stretches from the North Pole of this temperate world to just south of its equator. A metropolis of wealth and culture, capital of a planetary empire, and holy birthplace of Hadrian, first Pope of the Third Reformation.” The ruling Catholic-based society tries hard to convince Starbuck that he’s a crusader for their cause, but once his memory is jarred back in place, all hell breaks loose. Chaykin plays around with panel layout and sound effects lettering and the muted, pre-digital colors nicely enhance the story. You can see his style is well on its way to his 5-years-later masterpiece, American Flagg![2]

The Star*Reach Companion is a complete history and bibliography of the 1970s independent comic,printed by Twomarrows Publishing highlighting its importance to the comics field. Star*Reach's influence was enormous, impacting nearly every aspect of modern comics and genres, and showcasing such creators as Dave Stevens, Frank Brunner, Howard Chaykin, Steve Leialoha, Walter Simonson, Barry Windsor-Smith, Ken Steacy, John Workman, Mike Vosburg, P. Craig Russell, Dave Sim, Michael Gilbert, and many others. In addition to extensive historical coverage and interviews by author Richard Arndt, the book also features full stories from Star*Reach and its sister magazine Imagine, including a Cody Starbuck story by Howard Chaykin, 'Marginal Incident' by Fables artist Steve Leialoha and, presented for the first time in the original, intended version, 'Siegfried and the Dragon' by P. Craig Russell, one of the first of his operatic adaptations. Also included in the book is extensive information about independent magazines like witzend, Hot Stuf' and Andromedea that both preceded and followed Star*Reach in its mission to re-invent comics for a more mature audience. It includes a Foreword by Star*Reach founder Mike Friedrich, and a cover by Howard Chaykin.

Star*Reach #1 Star*Reach #4: The Return of Cody Starbuck (1976) Cody Starbuck one-shot, published by Star*Reach, 1978 Portfolio of four full-colour prints, published by S.Q. Productions, 1980 Heavy Metal Vol. 5 No. 2, May 1981, p. 48-59 and back cover The Star Reach Companion Heavy Metal Vol. 5 No. 3, June 1981, p. 82-89 Heavy Metal Vol. 5 No. 4, July 1981, p. 82-89 Heavy Metal Vol. 5 No. 5, August 1981, p. 82-89 Heavy Metal Vol. 5 No. 6, September 1981, p. 34–43 External links[edit]

Comic Book Bin

==
1250696021
=Cody Starbuck 1365eElon Cody Starbuck= From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search {| | |This article may not meet the general notability guideline. Please help to establish notability by adding reliable, secondary sources about the topic. If notability cannot be established, the article is likely to be merged, redirected, or deleted. (March 2009) |} Elon Cody Starbuck is the space pirate created by Howard Chaykin, who first appeared in Star Reach magazine, issue #1, and also appeared in various issues of the graphics magazine, Heavy Metal.He was featured in a Cody Starbuck Portfolio.

This was Four full colour prints depicting Chaykin's famous science-fantasy hero, very much in the old movie serial and SF Pulp tradition of Grand Space Opera. Published by S.Q. Productions in 1980.Cody Starbuck was one of two 'graphic novelettes' published by Mike Freidrich in 1978 ( the other being Craig Russell's Parsifal ) and was the third appearance for Howard Chaykin's rollicking space pirate.

Super Name: Cody Starbuck Real Name: None Aliases : Publisher: Star-Reach , Heavy Metal Gender: Male Character Type: Human 1st Appearance: # Appears in: 6 issues Birthday: Died: Add a new death issue... {| |

==Contents== [hide]*1 Publication *2 Publication History *3 External links *4 Reference |}

== Publication

1365e
Cody Starbuck 1365d
==


Following on from Ironwolf, Cody was Howie's first real go at what has since become the patented Chaykin hero: A morally ambivalent, free-wheeling good/bad guy in a decadent, sexually explicit universe who looks more than a little bit like Howie himself. Cody is the darkest of these characters; In his previous stories being gleefully venal & treacherous, and generally only doing good if the price is right. Basically a hero, but only just. A sort of X-rated Han Solo, if you like.Ofcourse,if you've met Howie Chaykin hero,you met them all.

Howard was the first to make the dream jump, barely a year after his pro debut, to creator/plotter/artist of his first original work, the swashbuckling space opera Iron Wolf in DC's WEIRD WORLDS. (Whether by Howard's decision or DC's, Denny O'Neil was tapped to dialogue.) Reading that material now, Iron Wolf may seem a small thing. But it's a pivotal strip for American comics, told with a verve much more modern than of the time and reintroducing a character type well known in comics today: the rogue. (You could count Marvel's Conan, but Marvel was backing off from his roguishness almost from his debut.) Even the edgiest comics heroes to that point were essentially John Wayne or Gary Cooper, the solid man who knows what's right and does it. Iron Wolf was Clark Gable doing Errol Flynn, with twinkle in eye and tongue in cheek, and, if not the real progenitor of many modern characters, at least the prototype for the progenitor, Howard's first pure creation, Cody Starbuck.

In late 1973, underground comics had just been effectively euthanized by the Supreme Court, aborting their conquest of the American comics market, but writer Mike Friedrich was determined to create a middle ground between underground and "overground" comics where the new breed of mainstream creators, who'd come up out of fandom and were equally familiar with Mr. Natural and the Human Torch, could create without imposed editorial burdens, and launched "ground-level comics" (the name didn't stick but the idea did) with STAR*REACH #1.

STAR*REACH launched with Cody Starbuck. Space pirate Cody Starbuck effectively stripped the last shreds of mainstream heroism from the Iron Wolf model, introduced an integrated visual/verbal narrative style that Howard would spend much of his career refining and developing, and created a template for creation after creation to come, not only for Howard but for the business. When Starbuck debuted, it emphasized the direction that Friedrich wanted to carve. When Starbuck subsequently got his own one-shot, it spurred a generation of comics pros to want the same for themselves and their creations, even if few had the faith or drive to get it.


Cody Starbuck's very early space adventure,was featured in Star-Reach#1. .The story was 16 pages,black and white,that began at the Sanyuary of St.Berryl-a leaper colony.Later,during the Papal Empire,it became a monestery and this were we first encounter Cody Starbuck.Brother Tomas had kiddnapped Evangeline Breedlove,bride of Sir Gideon Pickett,planetary lord of Korul for ransom.Pickett hired Starbuck to return his wife


(Apocryphally, Cody Starbuck is also rumored to be the inspiration for Han Solo in George Lucas' STAR WARS.Actually I talked Howard Chaykin back in the 1980's and stated.then he and Roy Thomas met with George Lucas,a drawing of Cody Starbuck was one the table.He believed thats where Lucas got the idea for Han Solo. And so that you see of the importance of this story, Cody Starbuck was one of the influences of George Lucas, as he himself said in his day, for some galactic trilogy.


In fact, Chaykin, was chosen to draw the comic adaptation of the film thanks to the requirement of good George.Perhaps this is true and perhaps not. The Scorpion -

The Scorpion was the best comic book that Atlas produced,although he resembled another version of either Lord Ironwulf,Cody Starbuck or Dominic [David Fortunov ? ] Fortune. In the first two issues, created by Howard Chaykin, we are privileged to see this fine graphic storyteller take quantum leaps forward in his storytelling ability. The Scorpion is a very important link in the chain that ends (to date) with First Comics’ American Flagg.


It seems to me that Chaykin, like Michael Moorcock, prefers to deal with archetypal heroes—always basically the same character in different guises. Thus, if you follow Chaykin’s creation of original characters over the years, you will find that DC’s Iron Wolf metamorphoses into Star*Reach’s Cody Starbuck, who evolved into Atlas’ The Scorpion, who blossomed into Marvel’s Dominic Fortune and Monarch Starstalker - all of whom finally jelled into the finest comic book of the 1980s: American Flagg. Even beyond the evolutionary importance of The Scorpion, this feature is worthwhile in its own right. Moro Frost, the Scorpion, is a man whose unusual longevity leads him through many adventuresome identities. In his Scorpion incarnation he is a mercenary with a heart of gold.

Howard Victor ChaykinEdit

Howard Victor Chaykin has shown tremendous versatility to write, draw and seeding controversy throughout his career. Ha firmado ilustraciones publicitarias, artículos de tema erótico, guiones para series de televisión ( Human Target, The Flash, The Sentinel o The Viper ), caricatura política y satírica, prólogos para libros, trading-cards, diseños de modelos para animación (famosa es su aportación para el filme de 1981 Heavy Metal , donde Chaykin fue autor del story board del personaje de fantasía heroica Taarna)... It has signed advertising illustrations, erotic theme articles, scripts for television series (Human Target, The Flash, The Sentinel and The Viper), political cartoons and satirical, prefaces to books, trading-cards, design models for animation (famously their contribution to the film Heavy Metal 1981, where Chaykin authored the story board of heroic fantasy character Taarna) ... Mas, nos interesa sobre todo por ser uno de los escritores y dibujantes de cómics yanquis con más personalidad y carisma. But we are particularly interested in one of the writers and cartoonists Yankees with more personality and charisma. Aprendió dibujo en el Columbia College de Chicago y en la School of Visual Arts neoyorquina; luego, atraído por las viñetas publicadas en prensa, fue “negro” de Gil Kane en 1968, de Gray Morrow y Neal Adams en torno a 1972, y ofició como asistente de Wally Wood en los seriales Cannon y Sally Forth al año siguiente. She learned drawing at Columbia College Chicago and the School of Visual Arts New York, then, attracted by the cartoons published in the press, was "black" Gil Kane in 1968, Gray Morrow and Neal Adams about 1972, and served as an assistant to Wally Wood's Cannon and Sally Forth serial next year. Pero ya entonces se mostraba Chaykin deseoso de trabajar por su cuenta, como lo prueba el comic Werewolf goes West publicado por Monster Times en 1972. But even then showed Chaykin willing to work on their own, as evidenced by the comic goes West Werewolf Monster Times published in 1972. De ahí pasó a realizar breves cómics románticos y de terror para DC y Marvel y, al poco, en 1973, asombró al público con adaptación del ciclo de espada y brujería de Fritz Leiber Fafhrd & the Gray Mouser para la serie Sword of Sorcery , de DC, y creando su propio mundo fantástico: Ironwolf. Durante esta etapa de su carrera, Chaykin se mostró interesado por aventureros como Shadow , Killraven o Dominic Fortune para Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction , y por personajes de Robert E. He went on to make brief romance and horror comics for DC and Marvel and soon, in 1973, stunned the audience with an adaptation of sword and sorcery cycle of Fritz Leiber Fafhrd & the Gray Mouser to the Sword of Sorcery series of DC, and creating their own fantasy world: Ironwolf. During this stage of his career, Chaykin was interested in adventurous as Shadow, or Dominic Fortune Killraven to Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction, and characters of Robert E. Howard como Conan (cinco episodios entre el núm. 79 y 83 USA, donde su estilo quedó sepultado por las tintas de Ernie Chan ), Kull (en Savage Sword of Conan núm. 2, con lápiz de nuevo velado por los entintadores), Red Sonja (en Kull and the Barbarians, donde sí mostró plenamente el vigor rabioso de su dibujo) y Solomon Kane (en Savage Sword of Conan y en Marvel Premiere). Howard and Conan (five episodes between no. 79 and 83 USA, where his style was buried by the inks Ernie Chan), Kull (in Savage Sword of Conan no. 2 pencil again watched by inking), Red Sonja (in Kull and the Barbarians, where it was raging full force of your drawing) and Solomon Kane (in Savage Sword of Conan, and Marvel Premiere).


. By the mid-seventies, her rebellion took him away from the big publishers and took him to Star * Reach for which created the eponymous head space opera Cody Starbuck.Starbuck is not a great creation.The stories and character logic is flawed at points,which point why guys Han Solo and Lt.Starbuck,who came afterwards worked far better and are more popular with the general Science Fiction public. In this we can find and all the topics that will make known to the author and subsequently recovered many of their scripts.


.. Is accompanied by a stunning graphic narrative, showing how much he learned from the composition of Gil Kane and bringing it to a new level Going solo, Chaykin initially made a splash among early fandom with trippy work on series like Cody Starbuck and Ironwolf (vampires, tall ships and intergalactic empires before they all became trendy). .. And remember that classic Indiana Jones scene, where Indy, faced with a charging swordsman, pulls a gun and shoots him? There it is in the second Cody Starbuck story, c. 1976.)


Howard Chaykin was one of the early adopters of the Star*Reach approach to publishing. His creation, Cody Starbuck, debuted the first issue of the anthology Star*Reach. Four years later, in 1978, Starbuck graduated to its own one-shot. In his introduction to the 1978 Cody Starbuck unnumbered one-shot, Friedrich wrote: “Chaykin not only shakes the tree of traditional space-opera, he pulverizes it. Don’t be fooled by the professional graphics. This is a punk comic.” Howard was just coming off a multi-issue run on Marvel’s Star Wars comics and the set-in-space Cody is Howard unfettered by the demands of a licensed corporate property. Starbuck mixes classic Chaykin elements, sex, violence, pop culture and religion, which gets an extra-special poke in the ribs. There’s even a scene in the comic that makes Friedrich’s “stomach turn with its violence,” which prompted the “adults only” label on the front cover.
Inside, Starbuck is stranded on a planet where The Vatican “stretches from the North Pole of this temperate world to just south of its equator. A metropolis of wealth and culture, capital of a planetary empire, and holy birthplace of Hadrian, first Pope of the Third Reformation.” The ruling Catholic-based society tries hard to convince Starbuck that he’s a crusader for their cause, but once his memory is jarred back in place, all hell breaks loose. 


Chaykin plays around with panel layout and sound effects lettering and the muted, pre-digital colors nicely enhance the story. You can see his style is well on its way to his 5-years-later masterpiece, American Flagg! Chaykin was regarded as a writer "respectable" by the champions of the then adult comics and not merely as a superhero artist, so Cody Starbuck was published in Spain by Josep Toutain in the journal Comix International and Area 84 (which also would be published the next book, American Flagg). {| border="0" bordercolor="#111111" cellspacing="1" height="100%" id="AutoNumber10" width="100%" | align="center" height="100%"| 1950, Newark, New Jersey Arriesgado historietista poseedor de gran carisma y de un arrojo inimitable que dedicó gran atención a los bárbaros de Robert E. Comic Risky keeper of great charisma and an inimitable courage devoted considerable attention to the barbarians of Robert E. Howard. Howard. | align="center" height="100%" rowspan="2"| |- | align="center" height="100%"| |- | colspan="2" height="100%"| ---- |- | colspan="2" height="100%"| {| border="1" bordercolor="#111111" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" id="AutoNumber14" width="100%" | height="100%"| | height="100%" rowspan="2"| Howard Victor Chaykin ha demostrado versatilidad enorme para escribir, dibujar y sembrar polémica a lo largo de su trayectoria profesional. Howard Victor Chaykin has shown tremendous versatility to write, draw and seeding controversy throughout his career. Ha firmado ilustraciones publicitarias, artículos de tema erótico, guiones para series de televisión ( Human Target , The Flash , The Sentinel o The Viper ), caricatura política y satírica, prólogos para libros, trading-cards, diseños de modelos para animación (famosa es su aportación para el filme de 1981 Heavy Metal , donde Chaykin fue autor del story board del personaje de fantasía heroica Taarna )... Mas, nos interesa sobre todo por ser uno de los escritores y dibujantes de cómics yanquis con más personalidad y carisma.

It has signed ad illustrations, erotic theme articles, scripts for television series (Human Target, The Flash, The Sentinel and The Viper), political cartoons and satirical, prefaces to books, Trading-cards, model designs for animation (famously their contribution to the film Heavy Metal 1981, where Chaykin authored the story board of heroic fantasy character Taarna) ... But we are particularly interested in one of the writers and cartoonists Yankees with more personality and charisma. Aprendió dibujo en el Columbia College de Chicago y en la School of Visual Arts neoyorquina; luego, atraído por las viñetas publicadas en prensa, fue “negro” de Gil Kane en 1968, de Gray Morrow y Neal Adams en torno a 1972, y ofició como asistente de Wally Wood en los seriales Cannon y Sally Forth al año siguiente.


She learned drawing at Columbia College Chicago and the School of Visual Arts New York, then, attracted by the cartoons published in the press, was "black" Gil Kane in 1968, Gray Morrow and Neal Adams about 1972, and served as an assistant to Wally Wood's Cannon and Sally Forth serial following year. Pero ya entonces se mostraba Chaykin deseoso de trabajar por su cuenta, como lo prueba el comic


Werewolf goes West publicado por Monster Times en 1972. But even then showed Chaykin willing to work on their own, as evidenced by the comic goes West Werewolf Monster Times published in 1972. De ahí pasó a realizar breves cómics románticos y de terror para DC y Marvel y, al poco, en 1973, asombró al público con adaptación del ciclo de espada y brujería de Fritz Leiber

Fafhrd & the Gray Mouser para la serie Sword of Sorcery , de DC, y creando su propio mundo fantástico: Ironwolf . He went on to make brief romance and horror comics for DC and Marvel and soon, in 1973, stunned the audience with an adaptation of sword and sorcery cycle of Fritz Leiber Fafhrd & the Gray Mouser to the Sword of Sorcery series of DC, and creating their own fantasy world: Ironwolf. Durante esta etapa de su carrera, Chaykin se mostró interesado por aventureros como

Shadow, Killraven o Dominic Fortune para Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction , y por personajes de Robert E. During this stage of his career, Chaykin was interested in adventurous as Shadow, or Dominic Fortune Killraven to Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction, and characters of Robert E. Howard como Conan ( cinco episodios entre el núm. 79 y 83 USA, donde su estilo quedó sepultado por las tintas de Ernie Chan), Kull (en Savage Sword of Conan núm. 2, con lápiz de nuevo velado por los entintadores), Red Sonja (en Kull and the Barbarians , donde sí mostró plenamente el vigor rabioso de su dibujo)


Howard and Conan (five episodes between no. 79 and 83 USA, where his style was buried by Ernie Chan inks), Kull (in Savage Sword of Conan no. 2 pencil again watched by inking), Red Sonja (in Kull and the Barbarians, where it was raging full force of your drawing) y Solomon Kane (en Savage Sword of Conan y en Marvel Premiere ). 

and Solomon Kane (in Savage Sword of Conan, and Marvel Premiere). Hacia la mitad de los setenta, su rebeldía le apartó de las grandes editoriales y le llevó a Star*Reach para cuya cabecera homónima creó el space opera Cody Starbuck. By the mid-seventies, her rebellion took him away from the big publishers and took him to Star * Reach for which created the eponymous head space opera Cody Starbuck. Desde ese momento alternó producciones de índole comprometida con trabajos para las grandes empresas. Since then alternated such productions committed to work for large companies. Así, en Marvel inició la famosa serie Star Wars ; trabajó para Warren, Archie / Red Circle y Charlton al tiempo que diseñaba sus propios mundos: The Scorpion (Atlas, 1975), Monark Starstalker (Marvel, 1976) y el de Gideon Faust


(Star*Reach, 1976). Thus began the famous Marvel Star Wars series, worked for Warren, Archie / Red Circle and Charlton while designing their own worlds: The Scorpion (Atlas, 1975), Monark Starstalker (Marvel, 1976) and Gideon Faust ( Star * Reach, 1976).

No sólo creaba mundos, también nuevos modelos de edición, pues fue el autor de la –para algunos- primera graphic novel , la que adaptaba la obra de Samuel R. Not only created worlds, new models of publishing, it was the author of the "some" first graphic novel, which adapted the works of Samuel R. Delany Empire (Berkley/Windover, 1978), fue él quien se atrevió a llevar a viñetas la obra de Alfred Bester


Stars, my Destination (Baronet, 1979, completada en 1992), y fue él quien adaptó la obra de fantasía heroica de Michael Moorcock The Swords of Heaven, The Flowers of Hell (Heavy Metal, 1979), historieta con la que renovó los lenguajes estéticos y narrativos del cómic estadounidense. Delany Empire (Berkley / Windover, 1978), it was he who dared to take a bullet work of Alfred Bester's Stars My Destination (Baronet, 1979, completed in 1992), and it was he who adapted the work of heroic fantasy Michael Moorcock The Swords of Heaven, The Flowers of Hell (Heavy Metal, 1979), which renewed the story with the aesthetic and narrative language of American comics.

En los años ochenta dedicó sus energías casi por completo a la editora First, donde hallaron cobijo sus más arriesgadas y aclamadas series: Time 2 (desde 1986) y American Flagg! (desde 1983). In the eighties he devoted his energies almost entirely to the Editor First, where they found shelter their most challenging and acclaimed series: Time 2 (1986) and American Flagg! (Since 1983). La última mencionada fue un vertido del saber artístico y narrativo del autor, así como un palenque ideológico y satírico que rompió moldes (fue nominada en 1985 como mejor historia corta de ciencia ficción en los premios literarios Nebula, algo inaudito hasta entonces).


The last mentioned was a discharge of artistic knowledge and narrative of the author, as well as an ideological and satirical palenque broke the mold (it was nominated in 1985 for best short story science fiction literary prizes Nebula, something unheard of until then.) Tras esta demostración de creatividad, Chaykin fue reclamado por la gran industria de nuevo a finales de los 1980 para escribir y dibujar magníficas reinterpretaciones de The Shadow (DC, 1986), de Blackhawk (DC, 1987), el celebrado buddy cómic Scorpio Connection (Marvel, 1989) y la casi pornográfica pero no menos genial 


Black Kiss , After this demonstration of creativity, Chaykin was claimed by big industry back to the late 1980s to write and draw great reinterpretations of The Shadow (DC, 1986), Blackhawk (DC, 1987), the celebrated comic buddy Scorpio Connection ( Marvel, 1989) and the almost pornographic, but not less brilliant Black Kiss

que tuvo que publicar en Canadá (Vortex, 1988). he had to publish in Canada (Vortex, 1988). Durante los años noventa, Chaykin ejerció sobre todo como guionista, pero alcanzó logros igualmente elevados. During the nineties, Chaykin served primarily as a screenwriter, but also reached high achievements.


Pocos ejemplos bastarán para recordarlo: Twilight (DC, 1990), el revival Ironwolf: Fires of the Revolution (DC, 1992), o la recuperación Farhrd & the Gray Mouser (Marvel/Epic, 1990), sus lápices para Batman: Dark Allegiances (DC, 1995) y Blood Truce:
Captain America/Nick Fury (Marvel, 1995). A few examples will suffice to remember: Twilight (DC, 1990), the revival Ironwolf: Fires of the Revolution (DC, 1992), or recovery Farhrd & the Gray Mouser (Marvel / Epic, 1990), their pencils for Batman: Dark Allegiance (DC, 1995) and Blood Truce: Captain America / Nick Fury (Marvel, 1995).
De entre todas ellas destaca Power & Glory (Malibu / Bravura, 1994), por su inteligente y ácida parodia de los superhéroes y por su reflexión sobre el poder. Of all these stresses Power & Glory (Malibu / Bravura, 1994), for his intelligent and acidic parody of superheroes and their reflection on power.
Estos últimos años, Howard ha seguido dibujando (para Aircel, Tekno, en la línea 2099 de Marvel...) y acumulando premios.
In recent years, Howard has continued drawing (for Aircel, Tekno, in Marvel's 2099 line ...) and accumulating awards. 

En su domicilio reposan siete premios Eagle, un premio Inkpot, el italiano Yellow Kid Award y el asturiano Háxtur. Resting at home seven awards Eagle, Inkpot Award, Italy's Yellow Kid Award, and the Spaniard Háxtur. Actualmente, alterna sus trabajos como guionista y productor de televisión con los cómics. Currently, between her work as a screenwriter and television producer with comics. Siete de los 22 episodios de Earth: Final Conflict fueron escritos por él y trabaja en la serie televisiva

Mutant X . Seven of the 22 episodes of Earth: Final Conflict were written by him and works in the TV series Mutant X. Al tiempo, ha sido coautor de las series plagadas de nostalgia Secret Society of Super-Heroes

y American Century , de DC y de DC / Vertigo, respectivamente, y autor completo de Blackhawk 4000 , otra vuelta al pasado a revisar personajes clásicos. At the time, has co-authored the series full of nostalgia 

Secret Society of Super-Heroes and American Century, of DC and DC / Vertigo, respectively, and full author Blackhawk 4000, another trip into the past to revise classic characters.

Que sepamos, ha contraído matrimonio al menos con dos mujeres: Daina Graziunas (colorista de Comet Man y Firestar , y coguionista de una de las etapas finales del Dreadstar de Jim Starlin, con quien Daina se casaría posteriormente) y Leslie Zahler (colorista de los primeros veinte números de American Flagg! ).

To our knowledge, has been married at least two women: Daina Graziunas (colorist Comet Man and Firestar, and co-writer of one of the final stages of Dreadstar Jim Starlin, Daina whom he married later) and Leslie Zahler (colorist of first twenty issues of American Flagg!).
Imaginamos que ellas habrán inspirado a Howard a la hora de urdir sus últimos proyectos: Mighty Love, lanzamiento de DC de 2003, sobre la relación de pareja de dos superhéroes, y un cómic para Marvel sobre la vida privada de las superheroínas, titulado provisionalmente Female Problems . We imagine that they have inspired Howard when concocting their latest projects: Mighty Love, DC, 2003 release on the relationship of two superheroes, and a comic for Marvel on the private lives of superheroes, tentatively entitled Female Problems. |} |} ==Publication History== *Star*Reach Issue 1 Stories:' 2 - Contents 3 - Death Building 10 - Fish Myths 12 - A Tale of Sword & Sorcery 24 - Suburban Fish 26 - Cody Starbuck 42 - The Birth of Death! 50 - The Origin of God! 51 - Star*Reach Productions (Ad) 52 - Cody Starbuck *Star*Reach Issue 4 Star*Reach #04: The Return of Cody Starbuck (1976) Date: 26 Aug 2009, *CODY STARBUCK, - Howard Chaykin, 1978 Star*Reach, 1st.Cody Starbuck, Howard Chaykin. Berkeley, CA: Star Reach Productions. Full color intergalactic adventure comic containing nudity. 1978 *'CODY STARBUCK by Howard Chaykin (Star*Reach, 1978)

This is a full color comic which shows just how good Chaykin was back then. The art looks like something Frank Miller would draw, but a few years before Miller was drawing like that. Chaykin’s line art in the comic is really stripped-down, letting the colorist (Chaykin?) add the shadings with color, not lines. That results in a far more attractive looking art than what Chaykin’s art normally looks like, IMO. This is one stylish, good-looking, ahead-of-its-time comic. *Cody Starbuck was first featured in the pages of Heavy Metal for a few issues *Heavy Metal 1981 *May - Vol. 5 No. 2 p.48-59 - "Cody Starbuck" - Howard Chaykin *Back Cover - "Cody Starbuck" - Howard Victor Chaykin *June - Vol. 5 No. 3 p.82-89 - "Cody Starbuck" - Howard Chaykin *July - Vol. 5 No. 4 p.82-89 - "Cody Starbuck" - Howard Chaykin August - Vol. 5 No. 5 p.82-89 - "Cody Starbuck" - Howard Chaykin September - Vol. 5 No. 6 p.34-43 - "Cody Starbuck" - Howard Victor Chaykin ==Characters named Starbuck== Starbuck is a surname, and may refer to: Fictional characters.Starbuck, the first mate of the ship Pequod in Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick.Lieutenant Starbuck, a character in the original 1978 [[Battlestar Galactica[[ film and TV series.Captain Kara Thrace, call sign Starbuck, a character in the 2004 Battlestar Galactica TV series.Nathaniel Starbuck, the main character in the [[[Starbuck Chronicles]] novels by Bernard Cornwell.Elon Cody Starbuck, a space pirate featured in the adult-oriented anthology Star Reach and in Heavy Metal magazine.Bill Starbuck, the main character in the play The Rainmaker (1954) by N. Richard Nash, later a film (1956) with Katharine Hepburn and Burt Lancaster; adapted by Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt as a Broadway musical, 110 in the Shade, in 1963, and revived on Broadway in 2007Starbuck, the nickname given to fictional character Dana Scully by her father in the TV series The X-Files.Starbuck, alternate name for a fictional philosopher mentioned briefly in the Principia Discordia.Starbuck is the titular consort of the Snow Queen in Joan D. Vinge's novel, The Snow Queen.Starbuck is a prominent subject of legend in David Clement-Davies' novel Fire Bringer Starbuck is a surname, and may refer to: {| cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="padding: 0.5em 0pt 0.8em 1.4em; background: transparent none repeat scroll 0% 0%; -moz-background-clip: -moz-initial; -moz-background-origin: -moz-initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: -moz-initial; clear: right; margin-bottom: 0.5em; float: right; width: auto;" | {| | ==Contents== [hide]*1 Publication *2 Publication History *3 Characters named Starbuck *4 People *5 Fictional characters *6 Places *7 Commercial *8 Entertainment *9 others *10 External links *11 Reference |} |} == People== *Chez Starbuck, American actor *George Starbuck, American poet *JoJo Starbuck, American figure skater *Michael Majalahti ("Starbuck the Canadian Rebel"), Finnish professional wrestler and rock singer *William H. Starbuck, organizational scientist *Edward Starbuck, Original settler of Nantucket, Massachusetts (with Tristram Coffin) *Joseph Starbuck, whaling ship owner, builder of "Three Bricks" in Nantucket, Massachusetts *Starbuck (whaling family) of Nantucket, Massachusetts, credited with the discovery of various Pacific Islands ==[edit] Fictional characters== *Starbuck, the first mate of the ship Pequod in Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick *Elon Cody Starbuck, a space pirate created by Howard Chaykin for the comics anthology magazine Star*Reach, first appearing in 1974. *Lieutenant Starbuck, a character in the original 1978 Battlestar Galactica film and television series *Kara Thrace, call sign "Starbuck", a character in the 2004 Battlestar Galactica television series *Nathaniel Starbuck, the main character in The Starbuck Chronicles novels by Bernard Cornwell *Dana Scully, a character in the TV series The X-Files, given the nickname "Starbuck" by her father *Bill Starbuck, a main character and con man in the play and film The Rainmaker, and the musical 110 in the Shade ==[edit] Places== *Starbuck Island, an atoll in the Line Islands, discovered by captain Valentine Starbuck *Starbuck, Manitoba, a town in Canada *Starbuck, Minnesota, a town in the United States *Starbuck, Washington, a town in the United States ==[edit] Commercial== *Starbucks, international coffee retail chain with headquarters in Seattle, Washington ==[edit] Entertainment== *Starbuck (band), a 1970s musical act *The Starbuck Chronicles, a series of historical novels by Bernard Cornwell *"The Return of Starbuck", the final episode of the TV series Galactica 1980 ==[edit] others== ==[edit] External links== *Comic Book Bin ==[edit] Reference== *Forgotten Comics: Howard Chaykin’s Cody Starbuck. {| |[1] |This article has not been added to any categories. Please help out by adding categories to it so that it can be listed with similar articles. (August 2010) |} Template:Space Opera.Template:Science Fiction Space Opera.Science Fiction {| style="background: transparent none repeat scroll 0% 0%; -moz-background-clip: -moz-initial; -moz-background-origin: -moz-initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: -moz-initial;" |[2] |This article about a fictional character is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. vde |} Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elon_Cody_Starbuck"Categories: Fictional character stubsHidden categories: Articles with topics of unclear notability from March 2009 | All articles with topics of unclear notability | Uncategorized from August 2010 | Uncategorized pages =====Personal tools===== *New features *Log in / create account =====Namespaces===== *Article *Discussion =====Variants===== =====Views===== *Read *Edit *View history =====Actions===== =====Search===== =====Navigation===== *Main page *Contents *Featured content *Current events *Random article =====Interaction===== *About Wikipedia *Community portal *Recent changes *Contact Wikipedia *Donate to Wikipedia *Help =====Toolbox===== *What links here *Related changes *Upload file *Special pages *Permanent link *Cite this page =====Print/export===== *Create a book *Download as PDF *Printable version *This page was last modified on 6 August 2010 at 20:36. *Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details.

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.
Starreach1
Elon Cody Starbuck is the space pirate created by Howard Chaykin, who first appeared in Star Reach magazine, issue #1, and also appeared in various issues of the graphics magazine, Heavy Metal. Cody Starbuck was one of two 'graphic novelettes' published by Mike Freidrich in 1978 (in the pages of Star Reach } and the other in the pages of Heavy Metal. the other being Craig Russell's Parsifal ) and was the third appearance for Howard Chaykin's rollicking space pirate. Following on from Ironwolf, Cody was Howie's first real go at what has since become the patented Chaykin hero: A morally ambivalent, free-wheeling good/bad guy in a decadent, sexually explicit universe who looks more than a little bit like Howie himself. Cody is the darkest of these characters; In his previous stories being gleefully venal & treacherous, and generally only doing good if the price is right. Basically a hero, but only just. A sort of X-rated Han Solo, if you like. Since the successful adquicisión rights Conan license, Roy Thomas, editor in chief of Marvel at the time, had continued to stress to Stan Lee to repeat another franchise success with literary, film or any kind (this License Search Micronautas also emerged, ROM or GI Joe), and thought the genre of science fiction of Star Wars and promises of amazing special effects it would bring. Thus, when the same George Lucas proposed to undertake the comic version of the film, asking the artist Howard Chaykin, Thomas excited about making a Space Opera, get the license to Marvel, not without some resistance from "The Man" , which was not very fond of comics publishing world outside their own superheroic and Lucas had previously rejected. [3] Finally gave the green light to the project, and in July 1977 came the first issue of Star Wars comic, with scripts of their own Roy Thomas and Howard Chaykin pencils pop (whose previous work in Cody Starbuck is one of the seeds of its own film recognized by George Lucas himself). In the first six numbers in the series adapted the first movie, and although Chaykin drawing in the first issue is disastrous, likely product of time-adjusted gradually improved under Steve Leialoha is taking the work of ink in the series. It is interesting to see how this adaptation of the film includes scenes not incorporated in the film and finally it has subsequently been extended editions of them. The Star Reach story made little sense,as Cody Starbuck went around in a mustatche looking for the bad guys.The Queen sat around her throne topless-obviously how rule the intergalactic empire-showing her breast.Great sensitively Howie-very mature.Not really.This the kind of pushing the envelope you talk about.Treating women like sex objects and sex toys for immature sexual fantasies.You either can porno or space adventur-not both.The whole story fringes on the villian having hands that clone droin puppets,that looked more Mister Hand of South Park. In this full-length tale, any previous ambivalence is out the window, as Chaykin charts Starbuck's journey from ostensible hero to out & out, unrepentant villain, perhaps going further here than with any of his subsequent character's. At an important point in the story, Cody has a choice to make, and without batting an eyelid, he makes what we would see as the wrong choice. But, as Howie says: "And so it goes. " Cody Starbuck is a bit of a flawed piece, for all it's brilliance. The ending is too abrupt, and, as fans said at the time, none of the stories about this character really follow on from each other, but y'know, where else are you gonna get such a blatant kicking to the Catholic Church in the form of a space opera? And fantastic early stuff like this made later masterpieces like American Flagg possible though, as you'll see, Howie was really pushing the envelope from day one.
Hc star2
==
Hc pin1
Possable Origin of the Name.== 1.Starbuck, the first mate of the ship Pequod in Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick.Possably the sourse of the Characters name.Elon Cody Starbuck, a space pirate created by Howard Chaykin for the comics anthology magazine Star*Reach, first appearing in 1974.Lieutenant Starbuck, a character in the original 1978 Battlestar Galactica film and television series,may or maybe be inspired by character,but most likely got the name from the same sourse as Herman Melvil character.Kara Thrace, call sign "Starbuck", a character in the 2004 Battlestar Galactica television series,is simply a female version of the original Lt.Starbuck,now used a Viper Pilots call sign and not an actual name,as the original Lt.Starbuck played Dirk Benedict..Bill Starbuck, the main character in the 1954 play The Rainmaker by N. Richard Nash and its adaptations.Possably another sourse for both characters names
Hc star3
Putting Atlas behind him, Chaykin continued to toil in the trenches of the comics industry, doing fill-ins on such titles as DC's Weird War. At Marvel, he and Len Wein collaborated on Dominic Fortune, another pulp-style character. They also put their heads and talents together for Gideon Faust, a Victorian era sorceror published first in in the pages of Star Reach, an independent sci-fi anthology comic, and later in Heavy Metal. codystarbuck.jpg He also continued to develope his own ideas while experimenting with a variety of artistic styles. When his Cody Starbuck debuted, his drawing style was very reminiscent of Alex Toth. A grand space opera, Cody Starbuck mirrored many of the themes later seen in the 1977 blockbuster film Star Wars. Chaykin was chosen to illustrate the Marvel Comics adaptation of the film. After a meeting with George Lucas in Burbank the year before the movie was released, Chaykin walked away with a box of 4000 stills and a portfolio of conceptual paintings by Ralph McQuarry. "The stills were incredibly dead an inert," he explains. “They looked like a high school science project. What freaked me out when I saw the film was it ended up looking like the McQuarry paintings, and that was the most profound effect, that they managed to do all the work in post. It's a tribute to what was done to that film after it was shot." Of course nobody had any idea the phenomenon that Star Wars would become. "Had I known, I probably would've worked harder on it. I still haven't gotten over the resentment of the fact that it existed in the pre-royalty times so I got chump change for those books.”
Hc hm01
== [edit] External links== * Comic Book Bin * Trip Atlas Star Reach (also spelled Star*Reach) was an influential, American science fiction and fantasy comics anthology published from 1974 to 1979 by Mike Friedrich. It is unrelated to the early MS-DOS computer game of the same name. Overview Significant as one of the first mainstream independent comic books, and the first with any significant distribution, Star*Reach bridged the gap between the countercultural underground comics and traditional Marvel/DC Comics fare, providing mature genre stories for an adult audience. Along with such other examples as Flo Steinberg's Big Apple Comix, published in 1975, and Harvey Pekar's naturalistic Everyman series American Splendor, first published in 1976, Star*Reach was an important forerunner to the late-1970s rise of the modern graphic novel, and of the 1980s' independent comics. Eighteen issues were released between 1974 and 1979. Most of the content was intended for an adult audience. Contributors included such Marvel and DC writers and artists as Howard Chaykin, Jim Starlin, and Barry Windsor-Smith. It also included prose short stories by such respected authors as Roger Zelazny, who wrote the 13-page "The Doors Of His Face, The Lamps Of His Mouth", with illustrations by Gray Morrow, in issue #12 (March 1978). Friedrich's company grew into a small publishing house, also called Star*Reach, that published the comic book series Quack; Imagine; and Lee Marrs' Pudge, Girl Blimp, along with a number of one-shot comics. The company ceased publishing in 1979. Eclipse Comics repackaged some of the original Star*Reach and Imagine material as Star*Reach Classics in 1984. Contributors Star*Reach #7 (Jan. 1977): Cover by Barry Windsor-Smith. Johnny Achziger • Neal Adams • Jeff Bonivert • Frank Brunner • Howard Chaykin • Mark Cohen • Gene Day • Steve Englehart • Fabio Gasbarri • Michael Gilbert • Dick Giordano • Sitoshi Hirota • Robert Gould • Eric Kimball • Paul Kirchner • Steve Leialoha • Lee Marrs • Al Milgrom • Jeffrey Morgan • Gray Morrow • Dean Motter • Masaichi Mukaide • Michael Netzer (Nasser) • P. Craig Russell • Dave Sim • Walt Simonson • Steve Skeates • Mary Skrenes • Bob Smith • Ken Steacy • Jim Starlin • Joe Staton • Mike Vosburg • Mal Warwick • Len Wein • Barry Windsor-Smith • Mark A. Worden • John Workman • Roger Zelazny References * "The Star-Reach Bibliography", by Richard J. Arndt This entry is from Wikipedia, the leading user-contributed encyclopedia. It may not have been reviewed by professional editors (see full disclaimer) Stub icon This article about a fictional character is a stub. You ca

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.